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Lack of vitamin D also causes allergies among children

26 Feb
In another example of the critical role that vitamin D plays in human development, it has been demonstrated now that children with low levels of this key nutrient develop allergies.
Vitamin D is relatively difficult to obtain from food (mostly fish) but we make it in our skin when irradiated by sunlight. Skin color variation is directly related to this necessity.
In the past lack of vitamin D in children (or their mothers) has been linked to rickets, incorrect brain development, autoimmune diseases and other immunity related problems. Allergies also fall within the problematic of inappropriate immunity and can well be considered autoimmune diseases, even if often mild and with very specific triggers.
Source: Science Daily.
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7 Comments

Posted by on February 26, 2011 in health, human evolution, pigmentation, vitamin D

 

7 responses to “Lack of vitamin D also causes allergies among children

  1. Ken

    March 5, 2011 at 11:51 am

    Infant vitamin d supplementation and allergic conditions in adulthood: northern Finland birth cohort 1966

     
  2. Ken

    March 9, 2011 at 11:24 am

    The above comment is actually the title of a study which found that vitamin D supplementation increases the incidence of allergies. In my opinion it is irresponsible of you to imply that the opposite is the caseHere is a nutrition bloggers post on a paper which I have already drawn your attention to. Vitamin D production from UV radiation: The effects of total cholesterol and skin pigmentationIn the comments somone asks "Since Vit D production isn't better in light-skinned people, why did lighter skin evolve when people left Africa? "The reply " Perhaps for the same reason that birds evolved all kinds of weird ornaments eh? Ole Darwin was right about so many things, maybe he got this one right too"

     
  3. Maju

    March 9, 2011 at 1:18 pm

    I think it is irresponsible of you to make the claims you make, specially when the "dark" category in that study is made up of white people (non ethnic Danish skin types V-VI) what may cause problems to truly dark-skinned people living in low sun radiation areas.Whatever the case, the paper acknowledges contradictions with other papers, where "Higher doses were required for darker skin types", etc.

     
  4. Maju

    March 9, 2011 at 1:18 pm

    I think it is irresponsible of you to make the claims you make, specially when the "dark" category in that study is made up of white people (non ethnic Danish skin types V-VI) what may cause problems to truly dark-skinned people living in low sun radiation areas.Whatever the case, the paper acknowledges contradictions with other papers, where "Higher doses were required for darker skin types", etc.

     
  5. Ken

    March 13, 2011 at 9:21 pm

    In a comment on your last Vitamin D post I said this 'Blood Vitamin D Levels in Relation to Genetic Estimation of African Ancestry'"African-Americans generally have lower circulating levels of 25 hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] than Whites, attributed to skin pigmentation and dietary habits. Little is known about the genetic determinants of 25(OH)D levels nor whether the degree of African ancestry associates with circulating 25(OH)D.[…]The effect of high vitamin D exposure from sunlight and diet was 46% lower among African-Americans with high African ancestry than among those with low/medium ancestry. " (And diet, think about the implications of that)."You obviously didn't think about the implications.

     
  6. Maju

    March 13, 2011 at 9:30 pm

    Whatever.

     
  7. Ken

    March 13, 2011 at 10:07 pm

    HERE is a link to a couple of specialized nutrition blogs. If you look in the comments you will see that a couple of people (one of whom is an MD and laughed at me when I tried to warn him a year ago) have come round to my way of thinking after supplementing vitamin D and getting really ill.Good luck with your health.

     

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